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Press translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0131, 1946-01-07.
Supreme Commander for The Allied Powers. Allied Translator and Interpreter Section.

translation-number: economic-0635

call-number: DS801 .S81



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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS
SUPREME COMMANDER FOR THE ALLIED POWERS
ALLIED TRANSLATOR AND INTERPRETER SECTION
PRESS TRANSLATIONS
No. 635 Date: 7 Jan 46

ECONOMIC SERIES: 131

ITEM 1 Conversion of Manufacturing Process of Ammonium Sulphate - Nippon Sangyo Keizai - 4 Jan 46. Translator: Z. Konishi.
Summary:
Availability of hydrogen gas, used in production of ammonium sulphate by either the electrolysis process or coal gas process, was heretofore, dependent on geography and other conditions. However, in the reconversion of factories, for production of ammonium sulphate, the new tendency is to have factories specialize in either the electrolysis process or the coal gas process. This is due to the serious shortage of coal.
The Ministry of Commerce and Industry's plan is that factories are to adopt either the electrolysis process or the coal gas process exclusively, depending on whether coal is easily available in places where they are located. Generally, in the districts of TOHOKU and HOKURIKU, where electric power is abundant, instead of bothering with the difficulties in transportation of coal, factories would convert to the electrolytic process. Factories are now studying which process will be best for them.
One part of the plan was revealed in detail as follows: The TOYAMA Factory of the NITSUSAN Chemical Company (NITSUSAN KAGAKU) and the HACHIDO Factory of the NITTO Chemical Company (NITTO KAGAKU) would convert to the electrolysis process gradually, and the NOBEOKA and MIZUMATA factories of the NITCHITSU Chemical Company (NITCHITSU KAGAKU), would convert to the coal gas process. In the process of conversion, unused equipment can be exchanged among companies. For an efficient change and smooth progress, co-operation between the Government and the people is very necessary.
ITEM 2 New Fertilizer Bureau Necessary - Nippon Sangyo Keizai - 4 Jan 46.
Translator: Z. Konishi.
Summary:
Mr. MORI, Cyo, president of the SHOWA Electric Company (SHOWA DENKI KAISHA) stated that under the present situation the establishment of a fertilizer bureau is very necessary. Since the production of fertilizer is important enough in itself, control of fertilizer production should be handled separately from that of other chemical products. In this way the production of fertilizers can be increased.
ITEM 3 JOBAN Coal Mine Sets Example by Foregoing Holidays - Gokyo Shimbun - 4 Jan 46. Translator: H. Shindo.
Summary:
Coal is essential for the survival of a new JAPAN. A report has been brought here from a pit some 700 meters deep in the JOBAN Coal-Field, stretching over IBARAKI-KEN and FUKUSHIMA-KEN.

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ECONOMIC SERIES: 131 (Continued)
ITEM 3 (Continued)
Prolonging labor hours on the last day of 1945, the laborers of this mine enjoyed only one holiday, New Year's Day returning to work voluntarily the following day.
Volunteer-miners of the TOKYO Transportation Bureau (TOKYO TETSUDOKYOKU) also returned to their duties that day. The miners stated that an increased number of laborers could not find more coal, and that existing miners must do it. The amount of labor available has been greatly increased by the demobilization of soldiers, the discharge of industrial workers, and the existence of seasonal laborers who work the mines only at the time of year they choose. Six thousand forced 1aborers had left by the end of the year. The labor problem in the mine is improving slowly. However, the miners said they were quite prepared to make every effort to dig the coal on their own initiative.
The Koreans and Chinese who were here during the war, who were skilled workers, are on their way home. Every type of work involved in coal mining must now be undertaken by Japanese miners. Experienced miners set themselves a high standard of health and enthusiasm for the work. More labor does not always produce more coal. In this sense labor in the mines is never directed labor. Experienced miners alone can respond to this urgent need. This is a further reason why the situation is not too bright.
Who will take over from the 3000 Korean and Chinese veteran pitmen? The very laborers who it is hoped, will meet this emergency are never forced laborers; nor, of course, can they be the war sufferers and people suffering from malnutrition, who have come here in swarms attracted by good food and housing. Then, who can improve conditions? There is no alternative but to recall veteran pitmen who have become black marketeers, and to encourage the best of the newcomers to make mining a career. The Coal crisis must be judged not only from the point of view of labor. Over-digging of coal is one of the reasons why the Coal-mining industry has not paid until now. The price of coal has been extremely low. Though emergency coal-production is being rushed, no repairs have been made in the pits. It is clear what will follow in the coal mines. When the stock of coal is finished, pits will be left deserted.
The JOBAN Coal Mine has surpassed every coal mine in KYUSHU end HOKAIDO in daily production figures. It is a pity that the JOBAN Coal Mine alone leads the coal production race. People would like to see the mines all over JAPAN competing in coal production.
Be that as it may, in the JOBAN Coal Mine, there is a new spirit, reader to sacrifice the New Year holidays.
Coal Production List
All-JAPAN (with 143 coal mines)
1940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57,309,000 metric tons
1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49,335,000 " "
KYUSHU District (with 83 coal mines)
1940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,055,000
1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27,531,000
HOKKAIDO District (with 34 coal mines)
1940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,373,000
1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,409,000
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ECONOMIC SERIES: 131 Continued)
ITEM 3 (Continued)
HONSHU District (with 26 coal mines)
1940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,876,000
1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,395,000
JOBAN COAL-MINE
1940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,613,500
1941 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,108,700
1942 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,530,900
1943 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,678,000
1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,007,000
1945 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 934,000 (first two quarters)
DISTRIBUTION "X"
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HomePress translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0131, 1946-01-07.
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