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Press translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0093, 1945-12-21.
Supreme Commander for The Allied Powers. Allied Translator and Interpreter Section.

translation-number: economic-0444

call-number: DS801 .S81



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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS
SUPREME COMMANDER FOR THE ALLIED POWERS
ALLIED TRANSLATOR AND INTERPRETER SECTION
PRESS TRANSLATIONS
No. 444 Date: 21 Dec 45.

ECONOMIC SERIES: 93

ITEM 1 Application to Charter Vessels Rejected by the Allied Powers - Yomiuri Hochi - 19 Dec 45. Translator: R. Shibata.
Full Translation:
Some time ago the Japanese Government was informed unofficially by the Economic and Scientific Section of Allied Headquarters that the Allied Forces are ready to grant the use of 21 vessels at MANILA to the Japanese Government. The Transportation Department presented a plan to Allied Headquarters for chartering the vessels, but it was rejected. The said ships are of either Laker or Baltic-coaster type and are from 2,000 to 4,000 tons. They are so badly damaged that they would require immediate repair. However, our country had expected to receive permission to charter these ships.
Shipping circles expressed the following opinions on the matter: "Cur Nation's ship tonnage has fallen to one-sixth of its pre-war strength. We have only two sea-worthy vessels of 10,000 tons or more. With such poor facilities on hand there is no way to overcome our present difficult situation except to charter ships. If in the future, we are allowed, by Allied Headquarters, to import foodstuff we shall require ships. The Transportation Ministers KOHIYAMA and TANAKA have made efforts to secure them. However, in the light of the refusal to charter ships we must give the problem our most urgent consideration.
It is not difficult to guess that sufficient heed must have been paid to public opinion in the Allied countries. It would therefore, be wise for us not to hope for kind treatment.
First, we should begin by conforming strictly to the directives of the Allied Powers, and then we should petition for permission to charter shipping space. We should endeavor to get unemployed seamen, who number about 30,000 at present, on board the ships of the Allied Powers so that these seamen may man the ships carrying Allied troops home. This would also facilitate the transportation of Allied materials to JAPAN. After having demonstrated our sincerity in this manner, we should petition for permission to charter ships in order to transport necessary materials to JAPAN.
It is said that the Military Repatriation Transportation Section (RIKUGUN KIKAN YUSOBU), and the Ship Administrative Bureau (SENPAKU KANRI KYOKU), of the Economic and Scientific Section are considering hiring Japanese seamen for this purpose. We urge the earliest possible realization of this plan. However, since the Allied Powers are very strict about Japanese shipping, granting of permission for the employment of Japanese seamen in the near future is considered rather doubtful.

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ECONOMIC SERIES: 93 (Continued)
ITEM 2 Basic Commodity Production Still In a Depressed State - Nippon Sangyo Keizai - 19 Dec 45. Translator: Y. Kurata.
Extracts:
According to the statistics issued for staple commodity production during the period July to October l945, by Commerce and Industry Ministry on 18 December, the following conclusions can be drawn as to the actual results of this production. However, black market merchandise is disregarded. The statistics were based on investigations conducted by various control associations. Total amount of production is believed to be somewhat greated than the estimated amounts.
The general reason for the industrial depression is the slowness of industrial recovery and a serious shortage of labor, coal, and other materials.
The conspicuous phenomenon in the period form July to October is a prompt reconversion of special steel products industries to production of civilian goods. These include the production of items made from pulp, motor cars, bicycles, trucks, and kettles.
The chemical industry is not in a favorable condition because of the poor production of coal and iron ore.
The production of rayon, rayon pulp, special pulps, ammonium sulphate, nitro-lime, leather, shoes, and kettles increased considerably since October.
Among the goods whose production had been small during the war and remains so, are: AP pulp, industrial paper, soda ash, caustic soda, cement for miscellaneous uses, fatty acid, absolute alcohol, pig iron, kerosent, volatile oil, light oil, heavy oil, motors, transformers, farming tools, rubber soled TABI (TN: Japanese shoes.), needles, wire, gas, and electricity.
The following chart show production of commodities by months.
STAPLE COMMODITY PRODUCTION
Item Unit JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER
Cotton yarn bales 0,680 (TN: Sic) 5,433 4,347 4,951
Rayon yarn pounds 196,700 158,102 67,170 240,890
Staple fiber pounds 1,509,248 445,727 471,100 937,900
Rayon pulp tons l,409 318 600 638
S.P, pulp tons 1,378 1,919 3,976 4,898
G.P. pulp " 4,866 4,055 8,359 10,005
X.P. pulp " 63 16 185 386
A.P. pulp " 37 34 28 11
Paper 100 pounds 12,027 6,583 9,886 14,66l
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ECONOMIC SERIES: 93 (Continued)
ITEM 2 (Continued)
Item Unit JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER
Industrial paper 100 pounds 231 84 0
Ammomium sulphate tons 9,477 4,474 5,898 12,100
Nitro-lime " 5,566 2,688 3,452 5,638
Monopoly Salt " 14,292 20,168 24,863 25,300
Table salt " 600 2,004 4,073 2,100
Industrial salt " 0 0 0 0
Soda ash " 2,100 1,000 0 143
Caustic soda " 4,000 1,600 100 500
Cement " 93,904 38,901 36,600 37,700
Cement for miscellaneous use " 1,155 260 280 35
Carbide " 13,784 7,648 4,943 6,358
Fatty acids " 622 386 246 238
Absolute alcohol Kiloliters 6,927 2,556 0 0
Alcohol " 12,530 6,762 0 761
Hides tons 350 280 270 300
Leather goods " 251 142 117
Tires and tubes for motorcars " 80 50 206
Tires and tubes for bicycles " 60 30 228
Pig iron " 53,339 15,211 9,467 9,568
Ingots " 77,187 19,056 4,159
Steel " 44,775 5,253 3,352 4,737
Special steel " 15,000 35,000 0 0
Copper " 2,229 567 200 604
Lead " 1,701 627 183 585
Zinc " 1,917 566 185 553
Mercury " 14,270 10,487 3,776
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ECONOMIC SERIES: 93 (Continued)
ITEM 2 (Continued)
Item Unit JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER
Aluminum tons 6,000
Coal 1000 tons 2,712 1,700 903 545
Coalite " 110,000 92,500 83,927 88,810
Crude oil Kiloliters 22,570 21,020 20,546 22,299
Processed crude oil " 28,555 16,649 13,255 16,100
Refined Volatile oil " 3,543 2,336 2,552 2,995
Kerosene " 6,066 2,918 2,586 1,843
Light oil " 1,641 917 654 1,100
B heavy oil " 3,599 2,786 4,123 3,387
C heavy oil " 307 230 0 0
Trucks 239 187 104 573
Bicycles 1,214
Motors 9,702 0 0
Transformers 3,000 0 0
Radio Receivers Sets 0 0 0
Vacuum tubes 1000 yen 41,666 41,200 40,000 38,000
Electric lamps per unit 370,000 183,000 349,000 226,000
Boiler " 0 0 0 0
Internal Combustion engines " 0 0 0 0
Farming tools 1000 yen 2,960 2,832 4,842 1,958
Wood working machines 1000 yen 2,000 1,000 500 1,200
Spinning machines per unit 0 0 0 0
Weaving machines " " 0 0 0 0
Pans " " 400,000
Iron pots " 40,000
Kettles "
Needles "
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ECONOMIC SERIES: 93 (Continued)
ITEM 2 (Continued)
Item Unit JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER
Shoes pairs 0 0 0 35,000
Rubber-soled TABU " 1,802 1,100 671
Soap tons 420 25 77 45
Nails " 1,730 1,250 300 100
Zinc plate " 250 118 200 211
Shovels " 45 82 140 45
Pick axes, and hammers " 40 26 15 35
Pipes " 0 0 0 100
Electric wire " 940
Gas 100 C
M
43,065 25,460 21,549 22,186
Electric power (Water) 1000 KWH 1,746,500 1,285,800 1,055,000 1,204,696
Electric power (Coal) " 53,400 24,700 9,200 368
Total Electric power " 1,979,900 1,310,500 1,064,200 1,205,064
ITEM 3 To Control Land Owners' Conduct - Nippon Sangyo Keizai - l9 Dec 45. Translator: T. Mitsuhashi.
Full Translation:
Some landowners are demanding the return of farmland from their tenants in order to sell it again at black market prices in anticipation of the Farm Land Reform Law. Therefore, the Agriculture and Forestry Ministry has issued and order to each governor, in the name of the Chief of the Agricultural Administrative Bureau, to restrain landowners from this practice.
The main points are:
The return of tenancy is provided for in Article 9, Clause 1 of the former Farm Lend Law. To define the paragraph "Independent cultivation is proper," the productive capacity of landowners and various circumstances concerning the tenants must be taken into consideration. It may not be determined through the wishes or needs of the landowners. There is no change in meaning, either in the present law or in the new one. Nevertheless, as land-owners are likely to demand the return of their land, the situation must be controlled to stabilize the position of the peasant proprietors.
Some landowners attempted to transfer land to their own families in name, only, and then attempted to sell it at block market prices. Care must be taken not to permit the transfer of ownership of land in accordance with the second paragraph of Article 7 of the Temporary Farm and Administrative Ordinance.

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HomePress translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0093, 1945-12-21.
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