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Press translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0079, 1945-12-17.
Supreme Commander for The Allied Powers. Allied Translator and Interpreter Section.

translation-number: economic-0389

call-number: DS801 .S81



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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS
SUPREME COMMANDER FOR THE ALLIED POWERS
ALLIED TRANSLATOR AND INTERPRETER SECTION
PRESS TRANSLATIONS
No. 389 Date: 17 Dec 45.

ECONOMIC SERIES: 79

ITEM 1 Labor Disputes - Nippon Sangyo Keizai - 15 Dec 45. Translator: K. Sato.
Full Translation:
Freed from what is called the "Industrial Patriotic Spirit", we are now up against a crisis of industrial revolution. How is the recovery of the activities of unions progressing and what is the present status of labor disputes? The following table is a summary of the actual conditions of labor unions organized after the termination of the war, classified according to types of labor:
25 November 1945
TYPES OF LABOR NUMBER OF UNIONS NUMBER OF MEMBERS NUMBER OF BRANCHES MEMBERS OF BRANCH
1. Metal Industry 1 119 1 2,650
2. Machinery and Industrial Tools 2 1,644 ___ ____
3. Chemical Industry 1 425 ___ ____
4. Gas, Electricity, and Water Works 1 2,080 2 113
5. Timber and Wooden Tools Industry 1 20 ___ ____
6. Printing and Book-Binding Industry 3 3,500 ___ ____
7. Architectural Industry 1 2,700 ___ ____
8. Communications 5 29,438 1 15
Total 15 39,926 4 2,778
Pastwar labor troubles have been gradually increasing since the end of September. There have been 40 desputes with 16,000 participants during this period. This shows an increase of four times as many disputes and eighty times as many participants as there were during the eight months preceding the war. The causes of the disputes are based primarily on the shortage of necessary goods, the rise in prices, and the loss of jobs. The reaction to this is becoming apparent in demands for increased wages and for an increase in retirement allowance, as well as opposition to dismissal. The following is a classification of kinds of labor disputes after the termination of the war:

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ECONOMIC SERIES: 79 (Continued)
ITEM 1 (Continued)
Number of Disputes after the War 40 Workers affected 16,089
Number of Closed Factories due to Strikes 20 Workers affected 9,639
Demands Made by the Strikers
Raise in wages 10
Opposition to the Regulation of the Factories 1
Opposition to Dismissal 5
Establishment of Retirement Allowances 8
Rejection of Supervisors 6
Others 10
ITEM 2 8,300,000 Tons of Available Coal is Estimated for Tar Products - Nippon Sangyo Keizai - 15 Dec 45. Translator: Z. Konishi.
Full Translation:
In order to obtain a certain quantity of tar products, basis raw materials are peace time industry an estimated, 8,300,000 tons of coal is required. Such is the estimate by the Tar Products Section of the Chemical Industry Control Association. That figure is a conservative estimate compared with the ten million tons which were required in 1943 and nine million tons in 1944 the critical condition of coal production influence of the present conservative estimate.
This is a statement of the supply and demand of the following tar products during a year's time. (in unit tons):
Pure Benzine
Production schedule 24,000
Allotment schedule
Dyestuffs 7,800
Interim products of medicine 4,800
Solvents and extractors for medicines 2,980
Organic gums 700
Photographic chemicals 140
Organic pigments 50
Synthetic spieces 50
Synthetic resin phenol 4,000
Extractor for oil 1,000
Succime acid 1,200
Agriculture chemicals 340
Insecticide l40
Others 600

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ECONOMIC SERIES: 79 (Continued)
ITEM 2 (Continued)
Pure Toluol
Production schedule 5,440
Allotment schedule
Dyestuffs 2,000
By-products of medicine 470
Other by-products 50
Solvents and Extractors
for medicines 400
Organic pigments 250
Synthetic spices 50
Saccharin 2,000
Solvent for paints 100
Others 120
Solvent Benzine
Production schedule 19,650
Allotment schedule
Middle products 100
Solvents and Extractors
for medicines 30
Synthetic resin 80
Agriculture chemicals 280
Solvent for gums 6,140
Solvent for paints 5,220
Fuel oil for motor-car
(Public use) 4,000
(Personal use) 3,000
Others 800
Coal Tar
Production schedule 450 000
Allotment schedule
Distillation and Refinement 360,000
Solvent for paints 14,000
Fuel at factories 40,000
Dyestuff for fishing-nets 8,000
Electrodes 6,000
Furance materials 11,000
Fuel for shipping 10,000
Others 1,000
Creosote Oil
Production schedule 90,000
Allotment Schedule
Absorbant for light oil 6,000
Solvent for gum 800
Fuel for shipping 35,000
Fuel at factories 30,000
Dyestuff for fishing-nets 4,000
Antiseptic for Lumber 12,000
Cover of electric line 900
Selection for mine ores 220
Others 1,080
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ECONOMIC SERIES: 79 (Continued)
ITEM 2 (Continued)
Pitch
Production schedule 220,000
Allotment schedule
Electrodes 12,000
Furnace materials 10,000
Pavements 2,000
Briquettes 28,000
Pitch-coke 110,000
Exports for KOREA 50,000
Others 8,000
(NOTE: The foregoing 110,000 tons of pitch-coke may eliminated since the interim report of the reparations committee prohibits the manufacture of aluminum metal.)
Phenol
Production schedule 3,960
Allotment schedule
Solvents and extractors for medicines 2,400
Synthetic resin 1,000
Agriculture chemicals 100
Selection for mine ores 360
Others 100
Raw Naphthalene
Production schedule 18,900
Allotment schedule
Distillatim and refinement 12,000
Cover of electric line 400
Carbon black 6,500
Refined Naphthalene
Production schedule 7,400
Allotment schedule
Dyestuff 800
Interim products of medicines 640
Other interim products 250
Organic gum 700
Organic pigments 350
Synthetic spices 50
Agriculture chemicals 200
Solvent for paints 620
Deodorizers 2,000
Explosive powder for industrial use 120
Napthole chloride 500
Decomposition for oil 100
Others 1,070
DISTRIBUTION: "X"
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HomePress translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0079, 1945-12-17.
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