Skip to main content
 Previous Next
  • Zoom In (+)
  • Zoom Out (-)
  • Rotate CW (r)
  • Rotate CCW (R)
  • Overview (h)
Press translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0044, 1945-12-04.
Supreme Commander for The Allied Powers. Allied Translator and Interpreter Section.

translation-number: economic-0208

call-number: DS801 .S81



(View Page Image)
GENERAL HEADQUARTERS
SUPREME COMMANDER FOR THE ALLIED POWERS
ALLIED TRANSLATOR AND INTEBERETIR SECTION
PRESS TRANSLATIONS
No. 208 Date: 4 Dec. 1945

ECONOMIC SERIES: 44

ITEM 1. Foreign Trade List - Nihon-Sangyo-Keizai-[illegible]30 Nov 45 Translator: T. Mitsuhashi.
Full Translation:
The figures of foreign trade covering the period from 1940 to the end of June 1945 were disclosed by the Finance Ministry on 27 November 1945 as follows:
(1) List of Total Amounts (Each unit equals one thousand Yen)
Year Export Amount Import Amount Total
1940 3,655,850 3,452,725 7,108,575
1941 2,650,865 2,898,565 5,549,430
1942 1,792,547 1,751,637 3,544,184
1943 1,627,350 l,92,350 3,551 700
1944 1,298,198 1,944,834 3,243,032
(First half year 1944) (669,958.) (816, 306) (1,486,264)
(First half year 1945) (353,219) (831,277) (1,184,496)
(2) Exports and Imports to and from Principal Countries
Exports
1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 (First half year in par.) 1945 First half year.
MANCHURIA KWANTUNG 581,592 558,108 568,359 480,288 357,154 (195,894) 107,124
Province 604,295 471,254 421,968 316,509 257,490 (127,202) 48,381
CHINA FRENCH 681,399 629,650 522,605 502,372 489,126 (250,960) 183,997
INDO-CHINA 2,567 45,377 144,380 97,034 21,761 (15,275) 1,899
THAILAND NETHERLANDS 49,346 65,649 66,462 87,833 10,910 (8,794) 3,178
EAST[illegible]INDIES PHILIPPINE 173,382 161,007 15,733 15,520 47,565 (26,935) 3,491
ISLANDS 26,700 13,361 1,328 30,053 36,871 (15,482) 1,210
GREAT BRITAIN 56,757 3,567 —- —- —- —-
GERMANY 74,896 34,881 39,012 15,202 560 (560) —-
UNITED STATES 569,065 278,388 —- —- —- —-
AUSTRALIA 72,748 20,873 —- —- —- —-
Others 763,103 368,750 12,700 42,539 58,761 (28,916) 3,939
TOTAL 3,655,850 2,655,865 1,792,547 1,627,350 1,298,198 (669,958) 353,219

(View Page Image)
ECONOMIC SERIES: 44 (Continued)
ITEM 1.(Continued)
Imports
MANCHURIA KWANTUNG 357,706 376,780 504,806 361,041 446,910 (201,097) 191,210
Province 59,232 45,363 41,473 39,081 28,915 (18,276) 7,907
CHINA FRENCH 338,910 433,264 676,166 921,584 1,248,776 (416,315) 539,846
INDO-CHINA 97,807 160,654 223,712 132,260 22,275 (21,571) 297
THAILAND 52,963 182,903 167,175 49,169 10,250 (10,211) 89
BURMA NETHERLANDS 76,055 84,789 11,715 4,861 6,159 (4,571) —-
EAST INDIES PHILIPPINE 125,313 153,704 12,751 99,818 684,524 (55,628) 1,248
ISLANDS 6,865 55,772 7,472 55,060 16,838 (11,7[illegible]1)) 1,248
INDIA 176,919 117,203 2,325 196 4,852 (4,849 4,714
BRITAIN 11,077 5,006 1,849 159 10 (5) 3
GERMANY 82,990 70,003 39,794 120,815 9,002 (2,039) 3,359
UNITED STATES 1,240,565 572,143 14,018 4,708 1,240 (886) 11,354
CANADA 73,867 19,928 4,311 58 29 (0)
BRAZIL 68,095 95,805 2,549 111 941 (0) 20,617
AUSTRALIA 94,161 78,088 21 13 1,810 (1)
Others 536,200 447,164 11,500 135,416 78,375 (69,076) 49,498
TOTAL 3,452,725 2,893,565 1,751,637 1,924,350 1,944,834 (816,306) 831,277
NOTE: Wartime Import from the Allied countries means the import of Allied countries products.
(3) List of Principal Commodities Exported and Imported (Quantity in each first line).
Exports
Commodity Unit 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 (First half year in parentheses) 1945 (First half year.)
Fish Products Tons 93,619 72,860 46,718 50,481 22,522 (11,666) 2,189
73,557 48,731 34,644 25,327 25,650 (14,557) 5,555
Silk Tons 17,621 8,563 490 751 123 (93)
446,060 215.706 12,500 23,894 6,562 (5.320)
Cotton Textiles Tens Millions yards[illegible] 1,854,002 1,018,798 166,612 189,043 82,430 (4,549 ton 1.322 ton
399,138 284,181 100,971 122,149 48,695 (22,499) 12,969
Artificial Fibre Textiles " 240,445 118,107 48,059 36,175 87,614 (2,628 ton) 478 ton
130,944 73,409 44,936 54,373 36,169 (16,614 5,357
- 2 -

(View Page Image)
ECONOMICS SERIES: 44 (Continued)
ITEM 1. (Continued)
Paper Tons 14,138 12,364 9,039 6,288 —- —-
78,635 98,083 75,622 53,757 59,896 (27[illegible]973) 8,541
Pottery and Glass - — - — - — - — - — - — - —
98,595 77,203 47,292 30,466 20,650 (11,607) 2,139
Iron Tons 371,395 286,665 177,629 101,709 55,522 (34,946) 16,112
108,407 [illegible]89,743 55,253 35,073 20,188 (11,639) 5,589
Ironware - — - — - — - — - — - —
87,260 53,966 38,998 24,688 21,011 (10,691) 2,970
Implements - — - — - — - — - — - —
267,142 274,492 230,917 239,793 220,657 (98,352) 59,280
Timber - — - — - — - — - — - —
108,953 53,956 42,179 17,021 29,933 (29,047) 15,800
Others 1,857,159 [illegible] [illegible] [illegible] 1,000,817 828,787 (447,609) 235,019
Total 3,655,850 2,650,865 1,792,547 1,627,350, 1,298,198 (669,958) 353,219
Imports
Rice end Unhulled Rice Tons 1,248,930 2,441,333 1,382,057 752,349 73,832 (72,424) 1,900
196,006 265,481 262,625 126,347 15,615 (14,991) 88
Beans Tons 487,234 514,566 648,758 278,727 375,364 (212,646) 226,125
112,756 119,489 154,150 126,505 116,518 (63,930) 59,713
Salt Tons 1,714,711 1,448,573 1,394,270 1,205,278 708,760 (437,092) 206,776
63,861 52,988 55,162 50,877 43,905 (22,590) 26,983
Hydrocarbon oils Kiloliters - — - — - — - — 519,156 (336,804) 29,453
352,460 36,247 23,988 83,959 35,502 (23,723) 3,642
Rubber and Tons 55,568 88,840 49,008 55,755 31,615 (26,038) 17,929
Resin 72,434 143,870 89,058 76,451 52,085 (42,209) 31,156
Raw Cotton Tons 465,506 358, 069 121,783 92,561 31,992 (15,728) 8,385
504,070 392,261 224,305 266,300 236,701 (87,025) 115,238
Coal Long Tons 5,085,013 5,187,771 5,162,826 4,416,636 2,425,094 (1,078,807) 482,200
116,731 143,025 159,556
Mineral Tons 5,584,189 5,572,895 3,840,605 4,568,187 2,174,738 (1,416,953) 528,144
204,044 197,029 126,083 143,148 105,809 (68,698) 10,917
Iron Tons 2,547,671 1,020,792 902,222 488,968 682,371 (130,336) 132,663
385,780 157,930 161,841 118,172 143,354 (36,498) 28,036
- 3 -

(View Page Image)
ECONOMIC SERIES:44 ( Continued)
ITEM 1 (Continued)
Fertilizer Tons 465,902 [illegible] 460,535 [illegible] 526,092 [illegible] 305,261
  [illegible]
279,762 (193,274) 72,692
76,864 66,994 81,139 68,439 89,385 (55,263) 24,322
Others 1,367,719 1,123,251 413,730 701,776 979,317 (350,752) 510,525
Total 3,452,725 2,898,565 1,751,637 l,924,350 1,944,834 (816,306) 831,277
ITEM 2 Four year public work program for unemployment relief and farm land development. Nippon Sangyo Keizai 30 Nov 45 Translator: R. Aoki
Full Translation:
Home Minister HORIKIRI obtained the approval of the Cabinet on 29 Nov, for his Ministry's program of construction of public works for land and river improvement. It is a panacea program in the sese that on one hadn it will help solve the problem of the unemployed, the number of which in November reached four million, and is fearer that it will reach ten million in the near future; This reconstruction program will hasten production of food by improving the lands. The program as presented to the Cabinet can be outlined as follows:
The program termed "Emergency Unemployment Remedy Through Public Works" shall be a four year program beginning this fiscal year. It includes river improvement (national, prefectural, and local government utilities), sand protection (national and profectural government works), road building (national, prefectural, and local works), and land development (national works). Ahigh priority shall be given to works which have been started or decided upon previusly. The selection of new enterprise will be governed by local conditions of unemployment and the relationship of the new project to other public works (such as the war-calamity reconstruction program) [illegible]shall be taken into consideration.
On the whole, for the determination of public works under this program the following three points sall be taken into account: 1. The work must require a great number of laborers. 2. The (public work must contribute to increases in food production). 3 It can be done without using too many important materials. In view of the urgent nature of the program, the aspect of the budget shall be promptly considered. For the prefectural or local undertaking liberal grants will be made as subsidies by the national government. A total amount of 2,664,530,000 shall be set aside for the main items divided as follows (in Yen): River improvement (National). 417, 400,000; Sand protection (National), 39,929,000; Land development (National), 18,020,000; River improvement (Prefectural), 1,239,181,000; sand protection (Prefectural), 450,000,000; River improvement (Local), 500,000,000; work days required for these projects are estimated as follows: 1945 fiscal 2,981,000; 1946 fiscal year, 119,180,000; 1947 fiscal year, 116,688,000 and [illegible]1948 fiscal year, 115,139,000.
The total amounts to 353,990,000 works days, or average employment for 450,000 to 460,000 men per day, when the work is once in full swing. With these works the Home Ministry expects to acquire new farm land and rice crops as shown by the following figures:
Fiscal Year Land Developed (In Cho) Rice (in Koku)
1945 5,294 31,764
1946 145,513 1,481,064
1947 149,510 1,509,460
1948 149,784 1,508,632
Total 750,101 4,530,920
ITEM 3 Brighter Aspect In Large Wartime Industries. Asahi Shimbun 30 Nov 45. Translator: T. Kitagawa.
Summary:
- 4 -

(View Page Image)
ECONOMIC SERIES: 44 (Continued)
ITEM 3 (Continued)
Allied Headquarters has permitted the Japanese Government to pay compensations to amunition industries, on condition that the are subject to the profits and capital levy taxes. Industrialists felt that the uncertainty surrounding their fate has now been lifted, despite the aforometioned taxes. Extracts of statements made be spokesmen of the important Industries. Association, the former Nakajima Aircraft Plant and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Company are as follows:
Although it is over three months since the end of the war there is still but a very small fraction of shipbuilding and motor vehicle production compared with prew r standards. The major cause of the delay is attributed to indesision concerning the compensation problem. The General Headquarters directive admitted that the compensation to be made to wartime industries will accelerate an industrial reconversion to peace time production. They are Keenly interested in determining how far back they should be dated. If it is dated from 1940. There will be a difficult problem in dealing with the reserve fund. Property taxes on corporations is nothing less than reducion or watering of the capital. This will place obstacles in ghe path of greater output. Also, it may help stimulate inflation.
The former NAKAJIMA Aircraft Company is prepared to reduce production to its 1936 level and to give up wartime profits without hestation. They are studying reconversion to peacetime industry. However, they expressed the hope that the tax would not be such so as to discourage enterprise, Now that the compensation policy has been disclosed they feel that they will be able to tide over the comng crisis with the stock holders. NAKAJIMA intends to establish a new corporation, which will not engage in heavy industry. They would not take action however, until General Headquarters discloses how large the business may be. If compensation is realized, it will go to meet the loan, amounting to 800 million yen, made by the Hypothetic Industrial Bank of Japan. The former NAKAJIMA Corporation may be liquidated or remain as a holding company.
If compensation is to be paid in full the Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Company will return its two and one half billion yen debt in order to be relieved of the burden of a colossal interest payment, a spokesman said, They inten to reduce the capital to a reasonable scale and to convert the financial structure to meet the situation. But they have no intention of creating new company. This is not feasible since they have more than 30,000 stock holders. Whether they decrease the capital by market operation or by devaluation of stock is yet to be decided, but the former probably is not practicable. The popular idea that the aircraft industry has accumulated a tremendous profit during the war is not true. Since the end of hostilities, retirement allowances and other expenditures affected their assets materially.
Special precautions should be taken to impose property and war profits taxes impartially and according to the capacity of a business to be taxed. Again a double tax should be avoided. The MITAUBISHI spokesman said, "The tax, should preferably be limited to the capacity of the private stock holders."
DISTRIBUTION "X"
- 5 -
HomePress translations [Japan]. Economic Series 0044, 1945-12-04.
 Text Only
 Text & Inline Image
 Text & Image Viewer
 Image Viewer Only