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John McCoy, letter, to Martha McCoy, 1864 June 13
McCoy, John

Dear Martha
after coming off guard this
morning it commenced to rain in torrents and my
mind perambulating and musing on the past
it drew to my recollection that this day six months
or the first half year of my absence from home
has drew its slow lengths along. at least with me
but not with those that measures time with the
rule of contentment, laying on the lap of ease
and luxury, but such is not the case with me
however I have no right to complain. I get all
I want to eat consisting of Bakers bread Beef
fresh and salt, some pork Bisciut coffee
some apples as Baked beans and hominy a
dish that you are not aquainted with it
resembles yankee samp. only that the corn
is white sometimes we have potatoes and
fried ham for dinner such board in the
north would be considered good but nothing
satisfies a discontented mind. I was
in hopes that time and habit would make
me more reconsiled to my fate but it seems the
longer the worse. I am compeled to asociate with
those whose manners and habits are quite at
variance with mine but so mite it be for
the present. the only thing that gives me any
pleasure is letters from home and I am very
sorry that you think it prudent to write so
seldom. there is no excuse for you, you have
plenty of material the little every day occurrences
of the children and you also of my friends and
neighbors is not considered by me either foolish
or nonseneceal nonsensical. I have already
answered your letter of the 24th ultimo and in
fact I have written so often lately I have forgot
what I have written consequentily it is imposs
-ible for me to rectify omissions ask for any
information you want and it will be
promply answered. I am happy to say that
my health is much better than it has been
for some time past my eyes are quite well
and my cough also. it is dangerus to eat any
-thing green or fresh on account of the
chronic diarehea one of my tent mates Pat
Downey came off Picket last saturady with
that disease and died in hospital on Sunday
evening. I am very careful—
It is rumored here and I believe with
some certainty that our Regiment is ordered
to the front at Richmond in charge of a
Siege Train or to act as infantry. I hear
a lot of 100 days men are on their way here
to take our place. By the last accounts
from Richmond it appears that the two con
-tending armies are in close proximity to
each other a decisive engagement must
soon take place and Richmond fall but
the amount of human beings sent to eternity
will be awful. do not neglect to write to me
I think the letters will follow us—
I am very uneasy about Tom his division
has been in several Battles you should try and
get the N.Y. Herald where the list of Casualities
are given and ascertain if possible if he
is Killed or wounded. as yet I have heard
nothing of gardner neither do I Know if
the 8th New York artillery has been sent
to the front- I think not for gardner
wrote me if such would be the case
N. Ann would go to Canada—-
our quarters are splendid for the summer
season we moved out of the fort some time
ago By order of the Doctor it is said
into an open field at the Corner of Broad
and end streets where the air has good
circulation, if we have to march I will
have to throw away the most of my
clothes as my knapsack will not hold
them neither could I carry them all the
little trinkets I have in my Beauro (cigar
Box) will have to be dispensed with—
you mentioned in a former letter about the
distance fort Totten was from Newbern
it is as close to the west side of the city as it can
be for the streets and only a few minuets walk
from any part of the wharf. get the cash from
Dan Jones or the pay for them the are worth
3 or 4 dollars- Blancheets and Learys cost if you
can
my love to you and all the children and all
my friends as usual your aff. Husband
John MCoy
I have got no pay yet their will be due at the end
of this month 88 dollars. Besides 275 dollars Bounty making
it all 363 dollars which you will look after If I am
among the missing you will need it all you can
also get the state aid if it is properly looked
after. if nothing happens me I will see to it before
long, there is some families the same as you getting
it from Mass be in good spirits it may
all be will with us yet. on the sixth of may
when Beauregards division was here ready
to attact us after sending in a flag of truce he
was orderd to Richmond by Lee. So an earth
-quake may he bid to spare the man thats
strangled by a single hair - all is fate- J.M.
HomeJohn McCoy, letter, to Martha McCoy, 1864 June 13
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