Windsor

Variant name of place:

Town of Windsor on Connecticut River

Geographic position:

41.8528° N, 72.6431° W

All related documents: retrieve them
Sources:

http://www.town-usa.com/connecticut/hartford/windsor/windsor_history.html. http://www.cerc.com/TownProfiles/Customer-Images/windsor.pdf. http://www.windsorhistoricalsociety.org/windsor_history.html. Geo coordinates from https://www.google.com/#q=Windsor%2C+CT+Geographic+Coordinates&safe=off.

General note:

Windsor is a town located in central Connecticut north of Hartford. The town is situated where the Farmington and Connecticut Rivers meet. These rivers served as fishing sources, and a means of transportation for the fur trade for the local River Indians, who called this place Matianuck. In 1631, the River Indians traveled to Massachusetts Bay Colony and Plymouth hoping to create an alliance with colonists that would help protect them from the powerful and aggressive Pequot and Mohawk tribes. The River Indians’ descriptions of the land that would become Windsor enticed the colonists to settle in the area. This settlement occurred after the English colonists learned that the Dutch had settled in Hartford; led by William Holmes, a group of colonists in Plymouth journeyed to Connecticut to establish a trading post in what would become Windsor in 1633. The town was incorporated in the same year. The English named the settlement Dorchester. In 1636, the colony of Connecticut authorized John Mason of Windsor to command an offensive against the Pequot Indians during the Pequot War. This is the Mason to whom the Mohegans entrusted their lands in what would become the important Mason Land Case in which Occom was embroiled. Land in Windsor was divided among families, and the town served as a significant port throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. The land that made up Windsor was so vast (16,000 acres) that townships continued to split from Windsor up until 1854.