Schenectady

Variant name of place:

Scenectady; Senectady

Geographic position:

42.8000° N, 73.9333° W

All related documents: retrieve them
Sources:

http://www.cityofschenectady.com/history.html. http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/resources/patent/05.html. http://fulton.nygenweb.net/Turnpike/Schenec2.html. Geo coordinates from https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Schenectady%2C+New+York+Geographic+Coordinates&safe=off.

General note:

Schenectady is a city located in eastern New York State. The area that would become Schenectady was originally controlled by the Mohawk Indians, the easternmost and most powerful of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy. The land making up Schenectady was one stop on the much larger Mohawk Trail, which extended from Schenectady to what would become Albany, New York. The name of Schenectady was a derivation of the Mohawk word, Schau-naugh-ta-da, which meant the place beyond the open pines. The first Europeans to arrive at Schenectady were the Dutch who established a settlement there in 1661. Schenectady would come under British control as Dutch power in the Americas waned and the British established the colony of New York. In 1690 during King William’s War, Schenectady became the target of French and Indian soldiers who attacked the town and killed 60 of its residents, an event that became known as the Schenectady Massacre. There was a smallpox outbreak in Schenectady in 1767, as noted in this collection’s documents. In 1780, Oneidas found refuge from Loyalist and Mohawk attacks in Schenectady, and the town served as a stop on the way to Brothertown, the pan-Indian settlement founded by Occom and other graduates of Wheelock’s school. Schenectady was designated a borough in 1765 and eventually incorporated as a city 1798.