Hudson River

Variant name of place:

North River

Geographic position:

40.7031° N, 74.0267° W

All related documents: retrieve them
Sources:

"North River." Random House Dictionary. 2014. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/North+River. "Hudson and Not North River." The New York Times. 26 September 1909. http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9B05EFDA1539E632A25755C2A96F9C946897D6CF. "The North River in New Netherland." World Digital Library. http://www.wdl.org/en/item/10084/. "Feature Detail Report for Hudson River." Geographic Names Information System. http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=gnispq:3:::NO::P3_FID:970226. "The Hudson Estuary: The River That Flows Two Ways." NY Dept. of Environmental Conservation. "Hudson River History." Hudson River. http://www.hudsonriver.com/hudson-river-history. http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/4923.html. Geo coordinates at https://www.google.com/#q=geographic+coordinates+of+hudson+river.

General note:

The Hudson River, frequently referred to as the North River in Occom Circle documents, runs 315 miles from Newcomb in upstate New York to the Long Island Sound. The Algonquin-speaking tribes that originally inhabited both sides of the river called it Mahicantuck, or river that flows both ways. In 1609, Henry Hudson, an English explorer employed by the Dutch East India Company, sailed up the river while looking for a passage to India and instead found thousands of Algonquians living in the river's valley. Hudson sailed as far north as Albany before turning back. Dutch traders settled the river’s banks and established trade in the colony that would become New Netherland. The Dutch called it Noort Rivier, or North River, by contrast to South River, the Delaware River. Only when the English began to assert their claim over the North River in the 1600s did it become commonly referred to as the Hudson River, to emphasize its "discovery" by an Englishman. The Dutch eventually ceded the river to the English in 1674 under the Treaty of Westminster, but the name North River persisted into the early 20th century. In their writings, Occom and his contemporaries refer to the Hudson as North River. Occom travelled along the North River from Mohegan to Albany during his preaching tours in the mid-1780s. Eventually, Occom sailed up North River for good, settling in New Stockbridge in 1789. Today, the name North River still refers to the section of the Hudson between New Jersey and New York City.