New Haven

Variant name of place:

New-Haven; N. Haven; Newhaven

Geographic position:

41.3100° N, 72.9236° W

All related documents: retrieve them
Sources:

Degnan, Francis. "New Haven - The Independent Colony." The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Connecticut. http://www.colonialwarsct.org/1638_new_haven.htm. "Life of the Quinnipiac Tribe." The Quinnipiac Chronicle. 28 Nov. 2002. http://www.quchronicle.com/2002/11/life-of-the-quinnipiac-tribe/. Bremer, Francis. "Portrait of a Family: Stamford through the Legacy of the Davenports." http://www.stamfordhistory.org/dav_bremer3.htm/. "History of New Haven." The City of New Haven Office of the Mayor. http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/Mayor/History_New_Haven.asp. Accessed 10/27/14. "We the People Called the Quinnipiac." The Algonquian Confederacy of the Quinnipiac Tribal Council. http://acqtc.org/Store/HomePage. Accessed 10/27/14. "Connecticut's Capitals." The Connecticut State Library. http://www.cslib.org/statecapital.htm. Accessed 10/30/14. Geo coordinates at https://www.google.com/#q=geographic+coordinates+of+New+Haven.

General note:

New Haven is a city in south central Connecticut on New Haven Harbor and the Long Island Sound. The Quinnipiac Indians, specifically the Momauguin band of the Algonquin-speaking Tribe, were the area’s original inhabitants. The Quinnipiacs lived along the banks of Connecticut's many rivers; fittingly, Quinnipiac means long water country. After Dutch explorer Adrian Block first sailed up the Connecticut River in 1614, Quinnipiac lands and peoples began to dwindle, especially as English settlement expanded. In 1638, Reverend John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton, a London merchant, sailed into New Haven Harbor from Massachusetts Bay Colony and formally established New Haven as a Puritan settlement. Though he did not have a royal charter for his new colony, Davenport signed a treaty with Quinnipiac sachem Momauguin in 1738, which gave the English formal ownership over the land. Davenport had left Massachusetts in the midst of the Anne Hutchinson controversy, likely coming to Connecticut to found his own Puritan theocracy. New Haven existed as its own colony distinct from Connecticut until 1665, when Charles II united the two under the Colony of Connecticut. From then on, New Haven referred to the city specifically, which in 1701 became the co-capital of Connecticut along with Hartford. In 1716, the college that would become Yale, where Eleazar Wheelock received his degree in 1733, moved to its permanent home in New Haven. From its creation, Yale was committed to training Christian missionaries; several of Wheelock’s Anglo-American missionaries studied at Yale while many of his Anglo-American students from Moor’s went on to study there. Wheelock took Occom to New Haven in 1744 to see Yale's commencement exercises, but due to terrible eye strain, Occom never attended the College. Because New Haven was the co-capital of Connecticut, any of Occom's or Wheelock’s dealings with the Colony of Connecticut often involved New Haven. By the Revolutionary War, the city had a population of 3,500, almost none of whom were Quinnipiac Indians. New Haven remained co-capital of Connecticut until 1873, when it lost to Hartford in what is known as the "single capital contest."