Bridgehampton

Variant name of place:

Bridghampton; Bridge Hampton

Geographic position:

40.9331° N, 72.3081° W

All related documents: retrieve them
Sources:

http://www.bridgehamptonpc.org/300Years/. http://www.shinnecocknation.org/history. http://bridgehamptonhistoricalsociety.org/about.html. http://historic.southamptontownny.gov/. Love, William DeLoss. Samson Occom and the Christian Indians of New England, 1899. Geo coordinates at https://www.google.com/#q=geographic+coordinates+of+Bridgehampton+NY.

General note:

Bridgehampton is a town on the southeastern tip of Long Island about 20 miles southwest of Montauk, NY. Its name is derived from the bridge English settlers built over nearby Sagg Pond in 1686. English settlement began on Long Island in 1640, when colonists from Massachusetts obtained land from the island's Shinnecock Indians. It wasn't until 1656, however, that the town of Bridgehampton was settled, when Josiah Stanborough built a homestead on Sagg Pond. Bridgehampton is now a part of the town of Southhampton, NY. Occom was associated with the Presbytery of Suffolk County in Bridgehampton and its Reverend James Brown. After meeting Occom at least two years earlier, Reverend Brown presided over Occom's ordination on August 29, 1759. Later, during Occom's many travels between his post as a missionary in Oneida and his home in Montauk, he often stayed with Brown at his home in Bridgehampton; they were close friends. In 1769, Occom visited Bridgehampton after confessing to "intemperate drinking" in a letter to the Presbytery. On November 1 of that year, the Bridgehampton ministers gave Occom the benefit of the doubt, concluded that he had simply been intoxicated from lack of food and a small amount of alcohol, and indicated their resepct.