Aupaumut, Hendrick

Variant first names: Hindrich; Hindrick; Hindreck
Variant last names: Aupaumet
Other namesCaptain
Birth: 1757 in Stockbridge, MA
Death: 1830 in Wisconsin
Faith:

Presbyterian

Nationality:

Stockbridge, Mahican

Occupation:

chief, captain, Indian agent

Residence:

Stockbridge

New Stockbridge

Wisconsin

Marital status:

married

Biography:

Hendrick Aupaumut, most likely a descendant of the Mohawk chief Hendrick, was a Mahican Indian who was born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts in 1757. He was educated by the Moravians and became very involved in tribal affairs and relations with the United States. Along with other Stockbridge Indians, Aupaumut fought as part of Captain William Goodrich’s company in the Revolutionary War, rising to captain in 1778. In 1777, when Joseph Quanaukaunt became sachem, Aupaumut became a member of his council along with Peter Pohqunnoppeet and John Konkapot. He also became close friends with Samson Occom and would often host the preacher or translate his sermons when the latter visited New Stockbridge, to where the Stockbridges moved in the mid 1780s. In 1787 he was one of nine Indians to write to Occom declaring their faith and asking Occom to become their minster. He was also one of the Indians to sign the proclamation that Occom, Pohqunnooppeet, and David Fowler carried during their tour to raise funds to support Occom as their pastor. By the 1790s, Aupaumut was acting as an agent for the United States. He helped the government combat Tecumseh and his brother Elskwatawa, and he fought under General Harrison in the War of 1812. Both conflicts interrupted the various land deals between tribes, as well as treaties and other negotiations, in which he was involved. Although he encouraged Indians to convert to Christianity and learn English, Aupaumut opposed leasing land to whites. Occom and Aupaumut agreed that the Stockbridges must move west to escape the influence of outside cultures, and to preserve their Christianity. In the 1820s, Aupaumut led land deals with Wisconsin tribes, and he finally moved west in 1829 along with the remainder of the Stockbridge tribe.

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Sources:

Calloway, Colin G. The Indian History of an American Institution: Native Americans and Dartmouth. Hanover: Dartmouth College Press, 2010.http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=270364. Cengage Learning. “Hendrick Aupaumut.” Accessed June 27, 2014. http://college.cengage.com/english/lauter/heath/4e/students/author_pages/eighteenth/aupaumutmahican_he.html. Love, DeLoss W. Samson Occom and the Christian Indians of New England. Boston: Pilgrim Press, 1899. Silverman, David J. Red Brethren: The Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the Problem of Race in Early America. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010.